Birmingham japanning & papier mâché industries.

by Yvonne Jones

Publisher: Birmingham Museums & Art Gallery in Birmingham

Written in English
Published: Downloads: 990
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Edition Notes

SeriesInformation sheet / Department of Local History, Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery -- 13
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17402987M

  Japanned papier-mâché tea tray bearing the patent mark of Henry Clay and painted with a scene of the death of Captain Cook. Image Andrew Frolows/ANMM The tea tray is made of papier-mâché and bears an impressed patent mark of Henry Clay, a noted manufacturer of papier mâché products located at 19 Newhall Street, Birmingham.   According to Samuel Timmins' book Birmingham and the Midland Hardware District, published in , there were people employed in the japanning and tin-plate industries in Wolverhampton and Bilston at the time. Japanning firms ranged in size from small family workshops, which often adjoined the proprietor's home, to a few large factories. Paper mache is a composite material involving paper pieces or pulp and originates from China. The Chinese would make helmets toughened with layers of lacquer while the Americans made paper boats. Today, paper mache is a fun craft that's appropriate for all ages and is even included in strategy video games like The Escapists. Papier Mache Clay Pots are ready to paint, collage, and embellish with your choice of art and craft materials. Create unique designs with paper, markers, acrylics, stickers, and more. Each pre-made flowerpot makes a fun, inexpensive base for a variety of projects.

ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: Includes index. Description: 96 pages: color illustrations ; 29 cm: Responsibility: Andrew Heaps, Mark.   Jennens & Bettridge were 19th century papier-mâché manufacturers at Birmingham in England. The firm produced objects like this writing slope. They ranged in size and complexity from boxes to beds and chairs to pianos that were displayed on their stand at the Great Exhibition at London. There is a legend a house made of papier mâche was.   Papier-mache had been used to make small boxes. Clay's new patent made it popular for furniture. The papier-mache was molded into ornate shapes and decorated with gold, mother-of . - Explore Beth Lewis's board "Indian Paper Mache Boxes" on Pinterest. See more ideas about Paper mache boxes, Paper mache, Paper pins.

An extremely Fine 19th century papier mâché travelling desk, profusely inlaid with abalone and mother-of-pearl foliage, retaining original Grecian key pattern borders. Provenance: Starting circa in Europe, gilded papier mâché began to appear as a low-cost alternative to similarly treated plaster or carved wood in architecture.

Birmingham japanning & papier mâché industries. by Yvonne Jones Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book is a long overdue history of the industry which centred on three towns in the English midlands: Birmingham, Wolverhampton and Bilston.

It is as much about the workers, their skills, and the factories and workshops in which they laboured, as it is about the goods they made. Henry Clay was an 18th century industrial pioneer who founded the japanning industry in Birmingham. Japanning was a process of varnishing and decorating a papier-mâché product.

It created a shiny black surface, which was painted. This book is a long overdue history of the industry which centred on three towns in the English midlands: Birmingham, Wolverhampton and Bilston. It is as much about the workers, their skills, and the factories and workshops in which they laboured, as it is about the goods they made.3/5(1).

Japanese lacquer-work was in high demand in 17th-century England, but following difficulties sourcing wares from Japan, English craftsmen began imitating the style, creating a ‘japanning’ industry, which thrived in the 18th and 19th centuries.

This is the most comprehensive guide available on the subject; it includes many photographic examples of japanning, detailing its origins.

The earliest mention of pearl in connection with the Midlands japanning industry is found in a patent (#) granted to Henry Clay infor making papier. "This attractive, copiously illustrated, and easy to use how-to-do-it book touches all the bases."-- Kliatt.

Out of print sincePapier-Mâché Today is back in print for a new generation of crafters of all ages. Papier-mâché is an easy activity for children at Reviews: Books Best Sellers & more Top New Releases Deals in Books School Books Textbooks Books Outlet Children's Books Calendars & Diaries Audible Audiobooks of results for Books: "papier mache" Exploring Papier-mache.

According to Samuel Timmins' book Birmingham and the Midland Hardware District, published inthere were people employed in the japanning and tin-plate industries in Wolverhampton and Bilston at the time. Japanning firms ranged in size from small family workshops, which often adjoined the proprietor's home, to a few large factories employing over people.

Full text of "A handbook on japanning for ironware, tinware, wood, etc., with sections on tinplating and galvanizing" See other formats A HANDBOOK ON JAPANNING A HANDBOOK ON JAPANNING FOR IRONWARE, TINWARE, WOOD, ETC.

WITH SECTIONS ON TINPLATING AND GALVANIZING BY WILLIAM N. BROWN SECOND EDITION, REVISED AND ENLARGED WITH THIRTEEN. The versatility of papier mache unfolds with recipes and directions for gifts to give and keep.

Catch up on new techniques and refresh your memory with traditional ones. Also /5(1). Actually, papier mâché was an important method of creating mass produced, inexpensive objects, both useful and decorative.

It was particularly popular during the Georgian and Victorian periods, between around andalthough papier mâché objects were being made in some places in the East, such as China and Tibet, since ancient times.

The Papier Mache was also felicitated by the National Institue of Fashion Technology, Chennai. This technique was brought to Puducherry by the French. Some of the earliest examples of the Tirukanur Papier Mache can be seen in the wall hangings at the ‘Kaps Koil’, or Our Lady of Angels Church.

The craft has been in Puducherry for years. Papier mâché was probably introduced into Birmingham by Stephen Bedford in the s. It had two distinct branches; one allied to architectural ornaments (not discussed by Jones as it was never japanned), the other allied to the japanning industry.

The firms of Henry Clay and Jennens & Bettridge are the best known Midlands japanners, and it was. Chapter 3 (pp) _chapter 4 trial 1 14/02/ Page Chapter III – A Lion of the District. both papier-mâché and japanning, pertinent to the manufacture of this chair.

DEFINITIONS "Papier-mâché" is a term that has been applied to innumerable three-dimensional objects having a paper core. The phrase can be confusing. It is it spelled many ways, ranging from the French papier-mâché to the Anglicized paper mache, papier.

Papier Mache lived on in America more as a craft form rather than a manufacturing material. Women started to make useful and decorative household objects. In the ’s a bit more papier mache interest was injected by a New York artist called Gemma, who while working with her husband in Mexico managed to stir up a lot of interest amongst.

Mar 8, - Explore jacques's board "papier mache books" on Pinterest. See more ideas about Papier mache, Papier, Paper mache. Wolverhampton and Bilston were important centres for the manufacture of japanned ware. Trade directories for list 20 firms of japanners in Wolverhampton and 15 in Bilston.

According to Samuel Timmins' book Birmingham and the Midland Hardware District, published inthere were people employed in the japanning and tin-plate industries in Wolverhampton and Bilston at the time. This book is a long overdue history of the industry which centred on three towns in the English midlands: Birmingham, Wolverhampton and Bilston.

It is as much about the workers, their skills, and the factories. PDF | A set of 19th-century furniture in black lacquer, on papier-mâché or on turned wood, has been subjected to an in-depth observational, historical | Find, read and cite all the research.

John Baskerville (), best known today as a typefounder and printer, had followed the same pattern as also a varnish maker and pioneer japanned ware manufacturer, setting up the first Birmingham japanning works inwhich produced mostly ‘cheap tin trays’.

The Midlands trade developed quickly. According to Samuel Timmins' book Birmingham and the Midland Hardware District, published inthere were people employed in the japanning and tin-plate industries in Wolverhampton and. Asian lacquer was admired as a precious and mysterious material. Adding to its rarity and desirability was the fact that the key ingredient, a resin extracted from the lacquer tree (toxicodendron vernicifluum) native to East Asia, did not survive the long duration of the sea voyage without hardening beyond an demand for lacquer was such that the Chinese and Japanese soon began to.

Birmingham became known for japanned papier mache, Wolverhampton for high-class tinware and Bilston for utilitarian goods. Early japanned tinware's forms were limited by handwork, but afterwhen James Nasmyth adapted the steam hammer, presses operated with a precision previously unknown to tinplate workers.

Gilt and lacquered papier maché In the lid is a painted glass panel inset with imitation pearls, rubies, and a crystal. Made by Jennens and Bettridge of Birmingham. Given by Her late Majesty Queen Mary. [pre October ] Materials.

Papier. Techniques. Lacquering; Japanning. Categories. Needlework accessories; Containers. Collection. Also found some papier mache artists that were pushing the limits of papier mache a couple of decades ago, but whose work is no longer easy to find.

This was a great addition to the book. I recommend it to anyone wanting to take papier mache to another level. Read s: 2. Pair of pole screens of japanned wood and papier-mâché painted with flowers; English, ca ; Jennens & Bettridge.

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no) The following excerpt is taken from Jones, Yvonne, Japanned Papier-Mâché and Tinware c. Woodbridge, Antique Collectors' Club, (ISBN 1 0.

Victorian Papier Mache. The Victorians loved to experiment with new materials and one of their favourites was papier mache. By the time Queen Victoria came to the throne, there were at least 25 companies producing papier mache items.

The most common pieces are trays, workboxes, inkstands, face screens, snuff boxes and letter holders. Review of Papier Mache Design Book by Monique Robert. My copy of Monique Robert’s new book, Papier-Mâché Design, arrived several days ago.

I read it through in one sitting, getting up only for a few refills of coffee. I can’t wait to use some of the methods she describes. It could have been used for dried or fresh flowers as the oiled and oven baked papier mâché was waterproof.

People Jennens & Bettridge, the firm run by Theodore Hyla Jennens and John Bettridge between andwere famous for the range of papier mâché goods manufactured in their factory at 99, Constitution Hill, Birmingham. Supplies needed: Paper Mache book, paint brushes/sponges, acrylic paints, an adhesive (mod-podge, spray or glue stick) and an image if you so choose.

I used the Scrapbooking Attitude product to transfer my image onto the book. The first thing I did was design what I wanted on the front of my vintage book.Books shelved as paper-mache: Discover Paper Mache by Liz Manson, Handmade: A Collection of Beautiful Things to Make by Cole's Home Library, Crafts and h.Image: Portrait of John Baskerville (), Type Founder and Printer, painted by James Millar in Oil on canvas.

Image from: Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery Baskerville was a great innovator. He introduced “japanning” to Birmingham, a technique for giving a shiny finish to papier-mâché, wood, and metal surfaces using a mixture of varnish, turpentine and oil.